Chemical

Phil Kinnane | August 22, 2012

COMSOL has had a great relationship with Emeritus Professor Bruce Finlayson of the University of Washington. I first saw him back in 2002 at an American Institute of Chemical Engineering (AIChE) meeting where he gave a presentation on the use of modeling in chemical engineering education. As a former President of AIChE and with a resumé covering some of the leading research and industrial advances within chemical engineering, I was quite intrigued by him taking the time and effort to […]

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Phil Kinnane | August 15, 2012

It has always been the flexibility of COMSOL Multiphysics that attracted people from the fuel cell and battery industries. The other software back in the day did not adequately support the ability to model the electrochemical equations that were required to properly describe the behavior of their appliances. As we noticed that more and more of these vendors were interested in COMSOL Multiphysics, this led to a great increase in COMSOL’s knowledge and ability to model these applications. For example, […]

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Phil Kinnane | May 21, 2012

I was just reading one of my favorite sites, phys.org, about the difficulties of working with nanostructures. In the world of batteries, you want to maximize charge, while minimizing volume and weight. This means that the nano-world is starting to take hold, but, as has been discovered with many other applications where nanotechnology is being applied, it is very difficult to control the material properties in this world.

Read more ⇢
Phil Kinnane | May 7, 2012

It’s an exciting time here as we’re starting to release a series of resources for COMSOL users and people interested in modeling and optimizing multiphysics and other engineering applications. This will be done as a set of CDs that will contain animated videos summarizing the features in COMSOL’s suite of products, and videos showing model examples being built. Also included on this CD will be white papers, conference articles, and reports of real-life situations where modeling has been applied.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Phil Kinnane | May 2, 2012

This Friday, a training course in modeling corrosion is being run at the COMSOL Burlington office. Participants will be introduced to the new Corrosion Module and will be led through a number of different exercises.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Phil Kinnane | April 30, 2012

We’re increasing the electrochemical family of products with the next version of COMSOL. Joining the Batteries & Fuel Cells and Electrodeposition Modules will be the Corrosion Module. This will allow for the modeling of all types of electrochemical corrosion (galvanic, pitting, etc.) as well as corrosion protection. This has been an exciting development and is the response to a number of COMSOL users who have requested it.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Phil Kinnane | April 25, 2012

While working on a project that involves corrosion I found this site that spends quite a bit of time explaining the phenomenon. This lab at the NASA Kennedy Space Center has done a great job in summarizing the different types of corrosion that can occur, and how they do occur. Galvanic and pitting corrosion are a couple of types I’ve heard of, but filiform corrosion is a new one.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Phil Kinnane | April 19, 2012

One project that has been really exciting to work with is a resource CD for our users and prospects. Called the Chemical Showcase, we will soon be offering this to engineers and scientists who are interested in modeling, and want to apply this to chemical engineering, battery, fuel cell, reactor and electrochemical applications. One of the fun things about producing the Showcase was recording this nifty chemical engineering video…

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Phil Kinnane | March 30, 2012

A couple of days ago I blogged about the team at Lahey Clinic who are using COMSOL Multiphysics to model their neuromodulation therapy of patients. In their example, they place electrodes close to the spine and, through electric current, stimulate the area around these electrodes to relieve back pain. The reason why modeling is important for them is because it’s quite difficult to actually access these treatments to measure their effectiveness and possible detriments.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Phil Kinnane | March 20, 2012

A great resource has just been produced for those interested in Lithium-ion battery technology. A white paper that describes how these can be modeled is available to download here.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

1 2 3