Electrical

Phil Kinnane | September 18, 2012

In short, electronic computer-aided design (ECAD) is typically used to design and develop electronic systems. Although it’s a mere letter away from spelling out “CAD”, there’s actually more to the story than appending the word “electronic” to “CAD”. So what is ECAD and why is it used in Finite Element Analysis (FEA)?

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Valerio Marra | July 30, 2012

All this talk about piezoelectricity got me thinking about how surrounded we are by everyday items whose performances rely on this physical process. Examples include inkjet printers, speakers, electric guitars, and ultrasound imaging systems. With so many different common objects utilizing this phenomenon, it may lead you to wonder: what is piezoelectricity?

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Phil Kinnane | July 26, 2012

Much has been written lately about increasing the energy efficiency of cars. Batteries and fuel cells are very hot topics, and not so long ago I blogged about the University of Michigan’s use of solar cells to fully power a car. Yet, even on the smallest of scales, such as the sensors in your car, improvements are being made. Utilizing a MEMS (Micro Electromechanical System) piezoelectric energy harvester, Alexander Frej and Ingo Kuehne at Siemens Corporate Technology in Munich are […]

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Phil Kinnane | July 24, 2012

Looking for a tutorial on how to model a MEMS problem? We have recently added a video tutorial using the example of how to simulate a capacitive pressure sensor to our video gallery. For a brief overview of what you can model in the MEMS Module watch the trailer below, or go straight to the bottom of this post for a link to download the model files, which show how to produce this type of electromechanics model.

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Phil Kinnane | July 23, 2012

How do you simplify a 3D geometry to reduce the computational resources required to model it? Do it in 2D. What if the phenomenon can only be properly simulated in 3D? Find the planes of symmetry and reduce the size, most engineering objects are symmetric in some way. What if there is no symmetry, such as the propagation of random cracks through a steel pipe? Well, as this story from COMSOL News shows, there are other methods, such as using […]

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Phil Kinnane | July 13, 2012

Transformers were first commercially used in the late 1800’s, but they are still being investigated at their fundamental levels. One of the stories from our latest COMSOL News concerns ABB (who themselves have been around since the late 1800’s) and their research into these apparatuses.

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Phil Kinnane | June 12, 2012

It’s long been known that a danger with corrosion is that it compromises the structures that it affects. This is particularly relevant for the naval industry where material failure leads to leaks and the like. Now, another danger is becoming apparent.

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David Kan | May 29, 2012

On the 17th of May, 27 engineers and scientists related to the oil and gas industry gathered in Northwest Houston to learn more about COMSOL Multiphysics applications for well logging. This area of research and development is of particular interest to the oil services companies, who make tools that help maximize the output from wells. These tools are highly advanced technological devices. They work by being inserted into a wellbore and detecting how much hydrocarbon (e.g., oil) is in the […]

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Phil Kinnane | April 26, 2012

We’ve just got another finished article and layout back for COMSOL News and it looks as great as the others, but for different reasons. We usually ask a couple of our partners to write an article for COMSOL News to provide users with some more technical background to modeling. AltaSim Technologies, who are certified consultants and even run courses in COMSOL, have written an article about surface plasmon resonance.

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Phil Kinnane | April 24, 2012

I’ve just been reading my favorite news service, www.physorg.com, and noticed that cloaking is once again the topic of the day. While we have previously reported on a group out of Duke University, this article mentions a group from Ames Laboratory in Iowa. Similar to the Duke Group, Costas Soukoulis from Ames Laboratory also seems to have been at the forefront of this research.

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Phil Kinnane | April 12, 2012

We first noticed that COMSOL was being used to model cloaking when an article on BBC’s website was brought to our attention. It related to a paper published by a famous scientist, Sir John Pendry, in Science. In it, he and his two co-authors, David Smith and David Schurig at Duke University, NC, laid out the theory for the cloaking of light and postulated that “a simple demonstration model that could work for radar might be possible within 18 months’ […]

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