Mechanical

Phil Kinnane | June 15, 2012

Previously, I wrote a blog post about Fiat using modeling to simulate the cooling of their lithium-ion battery packs. This got me wondering how lithium-ion batteries actually get hot in the first place.

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Phil Kinnane | June 13, 2012

This was the sentiment shared by Michele Gosso of Centre Richerche Fiat in Italy. On the forefront of designing electric and hybrid vehicles in the small truck market, Fiat will soon be introducing this technology to their famous Fiat 500.

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Phil Kinnane | June 6, 2012

The June issue of IEEE Spectrum included an insert focused on Multiphysics Simulation. This included a feature on cooling in hybrid cars, articles about metamaterials, the smart power grid, as well as biomedical applications.

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Phil Kinnane | June 4, 2012

One of the interesting stories from this year’s COMSOL News is the article concerning Johnson Screens®. They manufacture steel screens to block debris in water for pipes and valves. Their challenge is to design water intake screens with openings large enough for an unimpeded flow of water, but small enough to block enough debris depending on a specific application. This means that each screen must be custom-designed taking into account the characteristics of the debris and the depth at which […]

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Phil Kinnane | May 31, 2012

You may already be familiar with large regenerative heat exchanger (RHX) systems, but what about much smaller micro-channel systems? That’s just the type of invention the research teams at Intellectual Ventures (IV) are working on.

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Phil Kinnane | May 30, 2012

COMSOL News is now available in print and electronically, and you can request your copy of the multiphysics simulation magazine here. One of the great stories concerns a process engineer at Ruukki Metals in Finland, Mika Judin, who not only uses COMSOL to model and optimize his process, but lets the operators use the simulation too.

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Fanny Littmarck | May 22, 2012

Knowing the sun’s radiation and thermal effects is very important to designers within the building industry, especially in designing “green” buildings. Heat transfer also plays a vital role in designing outdoor devices in terms of maintaining temperatures in extreme hot or cold environments. To use the words of Nicolas Huc, project leader for the Heat Transfer Module development at COMSOL in France: “it makes a huge difference if you forget to take the sun’s radiation within account”.

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Phil Kinnane | April 9, 2012

Wind turbines are an expensive investment and once they’re up, they’re up. An article from last year’s COMSOL News points to how modeling can also help in remedying problems, if it’s too late to have built the perfect design from the beginning. With wind turbines, noise is of course the problem.

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Phil Kinnane | April 4, 2012

I had previously blogged about Thermal Cloaking, which uses layers of aluminum and paper to create an anisotropic structure and cloak a desired object. This differs from the “traditional” type of cloaking, of light and electromagnetic waves, which make use of metamaterials or layered structures that impose a negative refractive index to make the cloaked object appear transparent.

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Phil Kinnane | March 30, 2012

A couple of days ago I blogged about the team at Lahey Clinic who are using COMSOL Multiphysics to model their neuromodulation therapy of patients. In their example, they place electrodes close to the spine and, through electric current, stimulate the area around these electrodes to relieve back pain. The reason why modeling is important for them is because it’s quite difficult to actually access these treatments to measure their effectiveness and possible detriments.

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Phil Kinnane | March 19, 2012

While you may think that the prevalence of lightning strikes, would be a reason for not wanting wind turbines in your backyard, noise is apparently another reason. While this has become less of a problem in recent years, the noise is still there, and is always there whenever the wind blows.

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