Technical Papers and Presentations

Here you will find presentations given at COMSOL Conferences around the globe. The presentations explore the innovative research and products designed by your peers using COMSOL Multiphysics. Research topics span a wide array of industries and application areas, including the electrical, mechanical, fluid, and chemical disciplines. Use the Quick Search to find presentations pertaining to your application area.

Finite Element Modelling of Fireballs in Low Pressure Gas Discharges

C. Speer, J. Gruenwald, J. Seebacher, and A. Kendl
University of Innsbruck
Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics
Innsbruck, Austria

In the Double-Plasma (DP) device at Innsbruck University the formation of plasma fireballs is investigated. Under certain conditions such a fireball evolves in front of a positively biased electrode, which is surrounded by a weakly ionized background plasma. A complete theoretical model is up to now not available. In the present work the current experimental set up at Innsbruck University has ...

Fluid Memory for Particles in 2D Brownian Motion

S. Wolf, and J. Czerwinska
ARTORG Center
University of Bern
Bern, Switzerland

Thermal fluctuations of microparticles are an important way of transport in biological cells. While the fluid properties, such as viscosity, cannot always be directly measured, the random path of a microparticle can be observed under microscope. The relation between the diffusion and the fluid viscosity is analytically well described for spherical particles. Therefore, we have simulated and ...

Investigation on Numerical Modeling Aspects of Hydraulic Fracturing

C. Vinci, J. Renner, and H. Steeb
Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Bochum, Germany

During hydraulic fracturing processes, several coupled mechanical and hydraulical phenomena take place. We investigate an elastically deformable fluid-filled fracture embedded in a porous rock matrix. Despite the substantial number of previous modeling approaches, a clear insight into the numerical solution procedure of high pressure fluid injection in a fracture has not been gained. We use ...

Multiscale Hemodynamic Modeling of the Intrarenal Circulation

K. M'rabet Bensalah[1], J. Czerwinska[2], D. Uehlinger[3], R. Kalicki[3]
[1]University of Bern, Faculty of Medicine, Bern, Switzerland
[2]ARTORG Center for Biomedical Egineering Research, Artificial Kidney Research, Bern, Switzerland
[3]University Hospital of Bern, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Bern, Switzerland

In silico research is gaining interest in the medical field. Simulating the renal circulation is a very challenging and exciting task due to the high morphological and functional complexity of this system. In numerous renal diseases the underlying pathomechanism as well as the primary and secondary damages, concern the vascular system. A better understanding of the local hemodynamics will ...

Modeling and 2-D FE-simulation of Vortex Ripples Using a Three-phase Mixture Approach

T. Reisner[1], H. Steeb[1], and J. Renner[2]
[1]Institute of Mechanics - Continuum Mechanics, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany
[2]Institute of Geology, Mineralogy and Geophysics, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany

A new continuum-mechanical model for the study of sediment erosion, transport and deposition was developed using a three-phase mixture approach. It differs from existing two-phase models in that the sediment is modeled as two different phases, rigid sediment bed and mobile particles, instead of one phase. The model is currently implemented into Comsol Multiphysics using the Mixture Model and ...

Numerical Investigation on the Electrolyte (PBI/H3PO4) Management of a HT-PEM Fuel Cell

M. J. Hampe, S. Lang, H. Löhn, and T. Zeeden
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Fachgebiet Thermische Verfahrenstechnik
Darmstadt, Germany

PEM fuel cells based on Polybenzimidazole doped with phosphoric acid show many benefits in comparison to conventional perfluorinated sulfocationic membrane materials, but they suffer from a degradation partially caused by the loss of electrolyte. The first step to tackle this degradation problem is to understand the electrolyte management in high temperature PEMFCs. COMSOL 4.1 was used to ...

Eccentricity of Normal Electric Borehole Sondes with Finite Geometry

A. Galsa, and M. Herein
Eötvös University
Budapest, Hungary

Numerical calculations have been carried out to quantify the effect of the eccentric position of normal electric borehole sondes on the current density distribution and the obtained specific resistivity. In the most calculations the distorting influence of the eccentricity (distance between the axis of the borehole and the sonde) on the specific resistivity is less than 2%, but in special cases ...

Modeling of Mass and Charge Transport in Li-ion Battery Electrolytes – the Impact of Ion Pairs

M. Mutke, and H.-D. Wiemhöfer
Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry
University of Muenster
Muenster, Germany

In this contribution, ionic mass and charge transport in Li-battery electrolytes is modeled. In particular, incomplete dissociation of the Li-salt, which is a common feature of many commercial electrolytes and which has so far been neglected in most electrolyte models, is considered. For electrolytes in cells under various charging/discharging conditions, the development of local concentration ...

Electromagnetic Force and Torque Simulations on a Reaction Sphere Laboratory Prototype

L. Rossini[1], O. Chételat[1], E. Onillon[1], Y. Perriard[2]
[1]Centre Suisse d’Electronique et Microtechnique – CSEM, Neuchâtel, Switzerland
[2]Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne - EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland

The reaction sphere is a magnetic bearing electromagnetic spherical actuator for satellite attitude control. The reaction sphere consists in a 3D motor composed of a 20-coil stator and an 8-pole permanent magnet rotor. The rotor is synthesized wit a mosaic of 728 cylindrical magnets glued on the rotor back-iron so as to approximate the selected magnetization pattern. These cylindrical magnets ...

Quantitative Nanomechanics on Thin Samples with the Atomic Force Microscope

J. P. Müller, and T. E. Schäffer
Institute of Applied Physics
University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
Erlangen, Germany

One method for investigating the mechanical properties of samples like living cells with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is driving force-curves, i.e. measuring the force applied by the tip of the AFM as a function of the indentation into the sample. By fitting a Hertz-model, which predicts the applied force as a function of the indentation depth, one can infer the elastic modulus of the ...

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