Where Will Lightning Strike?

Phil Kinnane March 22, 2012

When it rains, it pours. Someone reading the previous blog posts I have been writing about wind turbines, sent me the following link to an article written in the Journal of Windpower Engineering & Development. This is a great piece that discusses the topic of lightning strikes and how their decommissioning of turbine blades affects whole wind farms. The author, Melanie Scott, presents a software that analyzes the prevalence of probable lightning strikes to wind farms based on both historical […]

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Phil Kinnane March 20, 2012

A great resource has just been produced for those interested in Lithium-ion battery technology. A white paper that describes how these can be modeled is available to download here.

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Phil Kinnane March 19, 2012

While you may think that the prevalence of lightning strikes, would be a reason for not wanting wind turbines in your backyard, noise is apparently another reason. While this has become less of a problem in recent years, the noise is still there, and is always there whenever the wind blows.

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Phil Kinnane March 16, 2012

Following up on my previous blog post about protecting wind turbines from lightning strikes, I got to thinking about other modeling aspects of wind turbines. Structural mechanics is of course important, and we have a couple of models that center on this.

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Phil Kinnane March 14, 2012

These last couple of months I’ve been working together with some of our users to get the next COMSOL News together. I’ve just finished working with a great application and I thought I’d give you a sneak preview of it.

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Phil Kinnane March 8, 2012

Many devices live with a dry, technical name that either basically says what the device does, or is an acronym of that dry, technical name. Very few get a nickname that sticks to become the industry standard.

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Phil Kinnane March 5, 2012

Someone who saw my RFID model blog post from a few days back pointed me towards a site that talks just about RFIDs. On it, I discovered a lot of articles about using RFID in the biomedical industry. This was an application that I had never thought of before. I’d always associated RFIDs with security, tracking packages and the like.

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Phil Kinnane February 27, 2012

While thinking about the blog post I published previously, about the hemisphere spiral antenna, I came across this article about RFIDs. Radio Frequency Identifications are small, inexpensive chips, which use RF to send stored information while being fixed to almost any gadget or personal effect.

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Phil Kinnane February 24, 2012

Reading physorg.com, I came across this story about miniaturizing antennas for smaller wireless devices. Apparently, the size of the antenna often limits the size of the wireless device – so let’s make those antennas smaller. The article is about a group from the University of Michigan who achieves this by using a hemispherical substrate with a spiraling antenna taking advantage of the volume that the hemisphere provides.

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Phil Kinnane February 22, 2012

Gecko lizards use dry adhesion forces to climb vertical and even backward-slanting walls. Yet, despite the strength they provide for holding their body to such walls, you can easily pluck them from their surface, and no residue is left behind. Imagine doing that with a TV.

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Phil Kinnane February 17, 2012

The blog post I wrote about Intel’s Concurrency Test produced some traffic, so I thought I would follow it up with some resources we have to support our users interested in modeling with clusters. First, I noticed a hugely popular thread in our Discussion Forum, with almost 11,000 views on the subject.

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