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Laminated core

Rosa Papadopoulou
Hello everyone,

I’m interested in simulating the induction heating of an object that occurs with the help of a rectangular coil that is placed above it. The problem that I’m facing is that I want to increase the produced magnetic field by using a soft iron core (U shaped and around the coil) that is laminated into 1665 parts and each one of them is insulated so that they won’t interact with each other. Is it possible to do this with Comsol? I would be grateful if someone could explain me how.

Thank you in advance,
Rosa

6 Replies Last Post Dec 20, 2012, 2:39 PM EST
Posted: 5 years ago Dec 6, 2012, 1:00 AM EST
Hi

It is certainly possible, but you will get a terribly complex and large mesh if you are in 3D, so you would probably need a cluster.
On the other side you can get reasonably close if you apply some good physics engineering tricks to your model, at least I would try this: use an anisotropic model of your iron, it will basically be for the conductivity, that should be set close to "0" across the laminated direction. The lamination is mainly for the Eddy currents, no ? and it should have little effect on the magnetic field

--
Good luck
Ivar
Hi It is certainly possible, but you will get a terribly complex and large mesh if you are in 3D, so you would probably need a cluster. On the other side you can get reasonably close if you apply some good physics engineering tricks to your model, at least I would try this: use an anisotropic model of your iron, it will basically be for the conductivity, that should be set close to "0" across the laminated direction. The lamination is mainly for the Eddy currents, no ? and it should have little effect on the magnetic field -- Good luck Ivar

Rosa Papadopoulou
Posted: 5 years ago Dec 7, 2012, 8:36 AM EST
OK I will try it! Thank you very much

Rosa

OK I will try it! Thank you very much Rosa

Rosa Papadopoulou
Posted: 5 years ago Dec 20, 2012, 3:13 AM EST
Dear Ivar,

I've tried to define the conductivity of the iron as anisotropic but comsol changes my option on its own to the other available options (isotropic,symmetric, diagonal). Do you have any idea why is this happening? I'm working in 2D.
Dear Ivar, I've tried to define the conductivity of the iron as anisotropic but comsol changes my option on its own to the other available options (isotropic,symmetric, diagonal). Do you have any idea why is this happening? I'm working in 2D.

Posted: 5 years ago Dec 20, 2012, 3:21 AM EST
Hi

it could be that in 2D axi you can anly use a limited set of anisotroy cases, to respect the 2D-axi symmetry.

Are you in 2D-axi ?

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Good luck
Ivar
Hi it could be that in 2D axi you can anly use a limited set of anisotroy cases, to respect the 2D-axi symmetry. Are you in 2D-axi ? -- Good luck Ivar

Rosa Papadopoulou
Posted: 5 years ago Dec 20, 2012, 3:25 AM EST
Hello,

actually I'm in 2D because the coil is a straight one.
Hello, actually I'm in 2D because the coil is a straight one.

Posted: 5 years ago Dec 20, 2012, 2:39 PM EST
Hi

but then anisotropy should apply (I can select anisotropic material in 2D and 2D - axi (v4.3a) ;)

--
Good luck
Ivar
Hi but then anisotropy should apply (I can select anisotropic material in 2D and 2D - axi (v4.3a) ;) -- Good luck Ivar

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