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Thin Thermally Resistive Layer on top of Boundary Heat Source

Bastian Schmitt
Hello everybody,


I want to simulate a flat mikroheater on top of a foil that is covered by a liquid. Since the foil has a thickness of about 100µm and the liquid covering the heater has a height of 1mm, the heater's height of about 0,5µm is almost negligible. Additionally the heater is covered with a thin passivation layer with 5µm thickness.

To simulate the temperature increase of the heater I wanted to use "Boundary Heat Source" with a defined "Total boundary power". On top of it I wanted to use a "Thin thermally resistive Layer", but I did not find out how to defne two layers on top of each other.

Is there any possibility to do so?


Many thanks in advance


Bastian

3 Replies Last Post May 18, 2016, 1:50 AM EDT
Bastian Schmitt
Posted: 4 years ago Jun 28, 2013, 5:58 AM EDT
Hi,

probably it is not possible, see: "can comsol support multilayer shell?"

www.comsol.com/community/forums/general/thread/28316/


Best regards


Bastian
Hi, probably it is not possible, see: "can comsol support multilayer shell?" http://www.comsol.com/community/forums/general/thread/28316/ Best regards Bastian

Nagi Elabbasi Certified Consultant
Posted: 4 years ago Jun 28, 2013, 4:18 PM EDT
Hi Bastian,

This issue is different from multilayered shells. A boundary heat source is not a “layer”. It is strictly on the boundary. A thin thermally resistive layer has to be internal to the domain. If I understand your problem correctly you should create a line/surface offset from the boundary and apply the thermally resistive layer there.

Nagi Elabbasi
Veryst Engineering
Hi Bastian, This issue is different from multilayered shells. A boundary heat source is not a “layer”. It is strictly on the boundary. A thin thermally resistive layer has to be internal to the domain. If I understand your problem correctly you should create a line/surface offset from the boundary and apply the thermally resistive layer there. Nagi Elabbasi Veryst Engineering

Erhard Schreck
Posted: 1 year ago May 18, 2016, 1:50 AM EDT
when you say 'surface offset' that would mean a physical thin layer which would need a lot of elements and defeat the purpose of thin layer definitions.
may be i misunderstand
when you say 'surface offset' that would mean a physical thin layer which would need a lot of elements and defeat the purpose of thin layer definitions. may be i misunderstand

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