Caty Fairclough | June 1, 2015

Happy birthday to the Paris-born “father of thermodynamics”, Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot. A talented physicist and engineer, Carnot channeled his interest in steam engines into the creation of a theoretical thermodynamic cycle called the Carnot cycle. Through this theory, Carnot laid the groundwork for the second law of thermodynamics, which relates to entropy and heat loss and is still relevant in physics and engineering today.

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Brianne Costa | March 12, 2015

Gustav Robert Kirchhoff was a German physicist famous for his vast contributions to the study of spectroscopy, electrical circuits, thermochemistry, and more. Kirchhoff developed laws and theories fundamental to electrical engineering, heat capacity in chemical reactions, and the composition of light emission from incandescent objects. He even helped discover two new elements! In honor of what would have been his birthday, here is a look at Kirchhoff’s legacy.

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Bridget Cunningham | January 20, 2015

On this day, 240 years ago, the French physicist and mathematician André-Marie Ampère was born in Lyon, France. Recognized as a founder of electrodynamics — or what is today known as electromagnetism — Ampère helped establish a theory defining the relationship between electricity and magnetism. We continue to celebrate the importance of his discovery in creating the groundwork for future developments in both of these fields.

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Fanny Littmarck | October 14, 2014

Today, many are celebrating Ada Lovelace Day around the world. This day is not a public holiday, but a day to honor women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

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Mark Fowler | September 22, 2014

Today marks the 223rd birthday of Michael Faraday, the famous British physicist and chemist. His remarkable contributions, particularly within electrochemistry and electromagnetism, helped pave the way for breakthroughs in modern science.

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Fanny Littmarck | July 10, 2014

One hundred and fifty-eight years ago, a boy was born in the middle of the night during a lightning storm. Today, we remember that boy as the brilliant man he grew into — the man who contributed immensely to science and engineering: Nikola Tesla.

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Mark Fowler | April 25, 2014

Born 140 years ago today, Guglielmo Marconi was a Nobel Prize-winning electrical engineer and an Italian inventor who is best known for pioneering long-distance radio transmission and the commercial success of radio.

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Andrew Griesmer | March 24, 2014

Born 179 years ago today, Josef Stefan was a brilliant Austrian physicist who studied radiation. He is credited with empirically deriving the relationship between the radiant energy of a blackbody and its temperature, known as the Stefan-Boltzmann law.

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Fanny Littmarck | February 19, 2014

On this day, in the year 1473, now famous astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus was born in Torun, Poland. His main contribution to science was the controversial concept of a heliocentric universe. Five hundred years later, we not only accept the sun as the center of our solar system, we even support new theories of planets orbiting two stars at once.

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