Fatigue

Mateusz Stec | July 22, 2013

Research on fatigue started in the 19th century, initiated following failing railroad axles that caused train accidents. In a rotating axle, stress varies from tension to compression and back to tension in one revolution. The load history is simple because it is uniaxial and proportional. Fatigue can then be evaluated with the S-N curve, also known as the Wöhler curve, which relates stress amplitude to a component’s life. In many applications we deal with multiaxiality and non-proportional loading. In this […]

Read more ⇢
Mateusz Stec | May 30, 2013

In many applications, loads applied to structures are random in nature. The sampling results of the structural response will differ depending on the data collection time. Although the stress experienced is not always high, the repeated loading and unloading can lead to fatigue. The engineering challenges in these types of applications are defining the stress response to the random load history in the critical points, and predicting fatigue damage. This is simulated with the Cumulative Damage feature in the Fatigue […]

Read more ⇢
Fanny Littmarck | February 7, 2013

If you’ve studied structural mechanics you’re probably familiar with stories of planes falling out of the sky due to fatigue (no one wants to be the engineer who designed an airplane that crashed…). Jimmy Stewart made a famous movie about that, but different from the usual horror stories of fatigue is the accident in 1919 of a storage tank that burst in Boston, spilling molasses onto the streets at 35 mph (56 km/h). The Boston Molasses Disaster, as it’s referred […]

Read more ⇢
Phil Kinnane | October 8, 2012

The release of COMSOL Multiphysics version 4.3a introduces the Fatigue Module to the world of multiphysics modeling. As the diagram below shows, the Fatigue Module is used to perform structural fatigue life computations for both strain-based and stressed-based fatigue. Since the release, I’ve come to realize that this has been a sought-after product for COMSOL users. But why should you simulate fatigue?

Read more ⇢