Structural Mechanics

Pawan Soami | June 6, 2014

How well you can strike a golf ball is not only determined by your muscle strength, but more importantly — it is influenced by several other factors involved in the mechanics of your golf swing. Let’s see how a multibody analysis of a golf swing can be used to improve the outcome of your stroke.

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Fabio Bocchi | June 5, 2014

Today, we will introduce the concept of residual stresses in structural mechanics and find out how to compute them by taking the example of a deep metal drawing process. First, we will explain how they can be computed and interpreted in a bending beam example with or without work hardening. Then, we will introduce a sheet metal forming model.

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Lexi Carver | June 3, 2014

Energy and telecom cables often journey through harsh environments to reach their destinations. Some cables are responsible for carrying high currents and must navigate in conditions that include high thermal loads, mechanical loads, and limited ventilation. We recently published a story in the IEEE Spectrum Insert, Multiphysics Simulation, explaining how the Prysmian Group, a leader in developing cable systems across many industries, has begun using COMSOL Multiphysics to improve their development process, save resources, and optimize their cable designs.

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Peng-Chhay Ung | May 28, 2014

In a previous blog post, we presented the applications of conjugate heat transfer involving immobile solids. The case of immobile solids simplifies the heat equation to be solved and is often a good approximation to the temperature field. Today, we will complete the description of the physics that account for thermoelastic effects of the material when heat transfer and solid mechanics are coupled.

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Fanny Littmarck | May 12, 2014

We have made a video tutorial for those of you who want to learn how to model stresses and strains in COMSOL Multiphysics. In under five minutes, we walk you through the modeling steps from setting up parameters and geometry to postprocessing the results. For simplicity’s sake, we use a wrench and bolt model to demo the concept.

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Walter Frei | April 9, 2014

In a previous posting, we looked at computing and controlling the volume of a cavity filled with an incompressible fluid, which solved for the static deformation of a fluid-filled rubber seal. In that example, we did not explicitly model the fluid, but added an equation to solve for the pressure, assuming incompressibility of the fluid. Here, we will extend this approach and include the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in the deforming container.

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Supratik Datta | April 4, 2014

Previously, you saw how to compute stiffness of linear elastic structures in 0D and 1D. Today, we will expand on that and show you how to model this in 2D and 3D. We will also show you an alternate method to compute stiffness.

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Supratik Datta | April 3, 2014

Today, we will introduce the concept of structural stiffness and find out how we can compute the stiffness of a linear elastic structure subjected only to mechanical loading. In particular, we will explore how it can be computed and interpreted in different modeling space dimensions (0D and 1D) and what factors affect the stiffness of a structure.

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Alexandra Foley | March 17, 2014

When modeling computationally taxing geometries, you can save time by using cyclic symmetry to cut down on memory usage. This can be more complex for rotationally than axially symmetric geometries. However, with the Structural Mechanics Module you can easily solve a single section of an impeller model and still get accurate results.

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Henrik Sönnerlind | March 7, 2014

Buckling instability is a treacherous phenomenon in structural engineering, where a small increase in the load can lead to a sudden catastrophic failure. In this blog post, we will investigate some classes of buckling problems and how they can be analyzed.

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Gerard Hegemans | March 4, 2014

Cars come with either an automatic gearbox or a manually operated one, a stick shift. With a manual gearbox, we use the stick shifter very frequently while driving the car, yet we hardly ever think about the way the mechanism works. Here, we investigate how it works and what forces are acting on it when submitted to a very common load case — selecting first gear — with the help of a COMSOL Multibody Dynamics model of the gearshift mechanism.

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