Andrew Griesmer | July 17, 2014

Professional baseball pitchers are able to make a baseball move left, right, down, and even up (sort of) to get it by the opposing batter. The physics behind this can be explained by the Magnus effect.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Laura Bowen | July 16, 2014

The need for a contaminant-free space to manufacture medicine has led scientists to try many creative new approaches to improve the process. At Argonne National Lab, creating a device that floats and rotates chemical compounds in thin air was just the answer they were looking for. It meant two important changes: the amount of each chemical necessary could be implemented very precisely and the risk of outside impurities disrupting the results was minimized.

Read more ⇢
Lexi Carver | July 15, 2014

In order to carry astronauts safely beyond earth’s atmosphere to where they can explore outer space, spacecraft must provide a very important chemical mixture: breathable air. Given the limits on space and weight for a manned shuttle, the systems flying aboard the craft must revitalize the air inside rather than carry the full amount needed for a mission. With this in mind, a team at NASA has developed an approach to atmosphere revitalization that relies on water adsorption.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Walter Frei | July 14, 2014

Whenever modeling magnetic fields in steady-state, transient, or frequency domain with the AC/DC Module, we want to reduce the size of the model as much as possible to minimize the computational resources and time needed to solve the model. Today, we will introduce the three types of symmetry boundary conditions that you can exploit in your modeling and show how to use them.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Alexandra Foley | July 11, 2014

There are many factors that go into designing the ideal oven — supreme cooking capability is a must, but energy efficiency and the use of materials with reduced environmental impact is also important. How can all of these different factors be combined to create an oven that is optimized for the best performance? Engineers working at Whirlpool Corporation along with the European green energy initiative, GREENKITCHEN project, found that multiphysics simulation was vital to the success of their design process.

Read more ⇢
Fanny Littmarck | July 10, 2014

One hundred and fifty-eight years ago, a boy was born in the middle of the night during a lightning storm. Today, we remember that boy as the brilliant man he grew into — the man who contributed immensely to science and engineering: Nikola Tesla.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Alexandra Foley | July 9, 2014

There are two types of anechoic chambers — acoustic and radio frequency (RF). Here, we explore how periodic structures can be used to help quickly model an RF anechoic chamber by reducing the complexity and computation time of the model.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Alexandra Foley | July 8, 2014

We’re excited to announce that COMSOL News 2014 is now available, which features stories about the cutting-edge research of engineers and scientists working in a variety of application areas around the globe. This year’s edition of the magazine provides insight into how multiphysics simulation can empower product development and help companies to stay ahead of — and create — new market trends. How is this achieved? Check out the magazine to learn more about innovative simulation techniques.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Fanny Littmarck | July 7, 2014

There’s a new book out there for those of you who work with or research electromechanical system design. It’s titled Multiphysics Simulation: Electromechanical System Applications and Optimization and is more than your average textbook. This is a reference guide on simulation and topology optimization written with both students and industry engineers in mind.

Read more ⇢
Fanny Littmarck | July 4, 2014

IEEE Spectrum recently sent out a “Tech Alert” that included an article about vacuum transistors, which combine vacuum tubes and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The article suggests that this technology may wind up replacing traditional silicon transistors.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

Alexandra Foley | July 3, 2014

Under an initiative by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), nuclear research reactors currently using highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel must be converted to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel with a goal to help prevent the spread of material that can be used to create nuclear weapons. Nuclear engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have turned to multiphysics simulation in order to precisely and accurately explore new designs for the safe conversion of the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor.

Read more ⇢

Article Categories

1 2 3 4 5 6 66