Here you will find presentations given at COMSOL Conferences around the globe. The presentations explore the innovative research and products designed by your peers using COMSOL Multiphysics. Research topics span a wide array of industries and application areas, including the electrical, mechanical, fluid, and chemical disciplines. Use the Quick Search to find presentations pertaining to your application area.

FEM Modeling in Robust Design for Graphene-Based Electromagnetic Shielding

S. Elia [1], G. Granata [1], P. Lamberti [1], V. Tucci [1],
[1] University Of Salerno, Italy

Electromagnetic shielding design is usually approached referring to nominal values of the main parameters. This could lead to malfunctioning devices and its performance differ widely from what was really aimed at or, worse, the final design product could even be physically unrealizable. This work presents a robust approach to the design of EM Shielding based on Graphene (Gph) layers. It is a two ...

Powerful automation and optimization methods for Material- and Process analysis with COMSOL Multiphysics and Matlab

T. Frommelt
SGL Group, Technology & Innovation, Meitingen, Germany

Thomas Frommelt received his PhD in physics in 2007 from the University of Augsburg for experimental work and simulation analysis on acoustically driven microfluidic mixing. In 2008, he joined the SGL Group and introduced COMSOL Multiphysics as the tool for flexible equation based modelling. Since then, he has focused on carbon material and process simulation employing methods of optimization ...

DNA Interactions in Crowded Nanopores - new

K. Misiunas[1], N. Laohakunakorn[1], S. Ghosal[2], O. Otto[1], U. F. Keyser[1]
[1]University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
[2]Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA

The motion of DNA in crowded environments is a common theme in physics and biology. Examples include gel electrophoresis and the self-interaction of DNA within cells and viral capsids. Here we study the interaction of multiple DNA molecules within a nanopore by tethering the DNA to a bead held in a laser optical trap to produce a "molecular tug-of-war". We measure this tether force as a function ...

Modeling Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers for Lithographic Applications

A. Fouquet [1], R. Orobtchouk [2], J. Hazart [1],
[1] CEA-LETI, Grenoble, France
[2] Institut des Nanosciences de Lyon (INL), Villeurbanne, France

Nano patterning for chip manufacturing has reached its limitation with 193i lithography standard process. Directed Self Assembly (DSA) of Block Co-Polymers (BCP) is envisaged as an alternative complementary technique that can reduce critical dimension and pitch with high throughput and limited cost [1]. For contact layers that require patterning of cylinders with diameter of tens nanometers, DSA ...

Magnetic Nanoparticles for Novel Granular Spintronic Devices

A. Regtmeier[1], A. Weddemann[2], I. Ennen[3], and A. Hütten[1]
[1]Dept. of Physics, Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany
[2]Dept. of Elect. Eng. and Comp. Science, Lab. for Electromagnetic and Electronic Syst., MIT, Cambridge, MA
[3]Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria

Superparamagnetic nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in modern electric devices. Recent developments have identi fied them as components for a new type of magnetoresistance sensor. We propose a model for the numeric evaluation of the sensor properties. Based on the solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for a set of homogeneously magnetized spheres arranged in highly ...

Positioning System for Particles in Microfluidic Structures

D. Kappe[1], A. Hütten[1]
[1]University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany

The possibility to detect and probe molecules in microfluidic devices gives rise to interesting applications. There are different approaches how to detect and probe particles, but a common step, for most methods, is to place the particles on a sensor. This can be done by applying external field gradients, or in this case by utilizing gravitational and hydrodynamic effects. Therefore, the sensor ...

Designing and Simulating the Performance Analysis of Piezoresistive Fluid Flow Pressure Sensor

K. PraveenKumar[1], P. Suresh[1], K. Subash[1], M. Alagappan[1], A. Gupta[1]
[1]PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

In this work, we present the performance analysis of novel micro machined Piezoresistive fluid flow pressure sensor using COMSOL Multiphysics. The principle of the sensing mechanism is based on the deflection of four sensing layers embedded on a thin membrane. The fluid passes through the layer causes the deflection of the sensing layer which measures the pressure of the fluid. The following ...

Design of a MEMS Resonator for a Centre Frequency Greater than 26.35 MHz and Temperature Coefficient Frequency Less than 0.5 ppm

S.Manikandan[1], R.Radeep krishna[1]
[1]Kalasalingam University, Department of ECE, Srivilliputtur ,Krishnan koil, Tamil Nadu, India

The variability of the design parameters caused by material properties like thermal conductivity is the major challenge in Micro Electromechanical System (MEMS). In resonator design the basic problem is that the frequency changes with temperature variation and quantitative explanation with respect to this varies. The change can be attributed to the stability in terms of frequency drift in parts ...

Study of Artificial Molecular Engines Action Through COMSOL Multiphysics® Program

L. Moro[1], F. Lugli[1], and F. Zerbetto[1]

[1]Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy

Rotaxanes are a class of molecules recently developed in laboratory that have been heralded as possible molecular motors. The motor is constituted by a linear molecule (thread) and a ring-shaped molecule (macrocycle), which is free to move along the thread, switching between two, or more, energetically stable interaction points (stations). Molecular motors start their functioning far from ...

Study of Fluid and Mass Adsorption Model in the QCM-D Sensor for Characterization of Biomolecular Interaction

H.J. Kwon[1], C.K. Bradfield[1], B.T. Dodge[1], and G.S. Agoki[1]
[1]Department of Engineering and Computer Science, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, USA

Increasing attention has been paid to application of the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) sensor for monitoring biomolecular interactions. This paper focuses on a practical application of protein-protein binding affinity measurement at low concentrations and minimal sample sizes (50-200 μl of 20-200 nM), which results in low signal measurement. A model simulating fluid ...