How does COMSOL solve the acoustic-structure interaction? Specific details mentioned below.

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I'm trying to understand how COMSOL solves the acoustic-structure interaction. In particular, I implemented the spherical piezoelectric transducer model, provided as an example (PDF attached for your reference). I understand that at the interface, COMSOL implements the pressure continuity and the velocity continuity conditions. But, it is unclear to me about the exact method the software uses to implement the boundary conditions. Does it use the boundary element method (BEM), or a finite element method (FEM), or a hybrid FEM-BEM method? The physics that this module uses are PRESSURE ACOUSTICS, FREQUENCY DOMAIN; SOLID MECHANICS, and ELECTROSTATICS.

Any fruitful discussion or directing to the related discussion will be much appreciated.

Thank you



1 Reply Last Post Sep 11, 2019, 8:04 AM EDT
Henrik Sönnerlind COMSOL Employee

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Posted: 1 week ago Sep 11, 2019, 8:04 AM EDT

Hi,

The physics interfaces you are mentioning are all FEM interfaces, so the coupling is a pure pressure and velocity continuity in the FEM sense. These boundary couplings are formulated using the same type of weak formulation as the equations as in the surrounding domains.

If you are interested in the details, switch on Equation View. Then you can examine the actual expressions.

As an alternative, you can use BEM formulations for acoustics and electrostatics. In that case, the couplings would be slightly different, since they would now requires a FEM-BEM coupling.

Regards,
Henrik

Hi, The physics interfaces you are mentioning are all FEM interfaces, so the coupling is a pure pressure and velocity continuity in the FEM sense. These boundary couplings are formulated using the same type of weak formulation as the equations as in the surrounding domains. If you are interested in the details, switch on Equation View. Then you can examine the actual expressions. As an alternative, you can use BEM formulations for acoustics and electrostatics. In that case, the couplings would be slightly different, since they would now requires a FEM-BEM coupling. Regards, Henrik

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