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Problem Solving

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How can I simulate the electric fields and potential distribution around a plate and cylinder using the COMSOL Multiphysics simulation package (version 6.1) in order to study their behavior in a uniform electric field?


3 Replies Last Post Jun 6, 2023, 9:24 a.m. EDT
Robert Koslover Certified Consultant

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Posted: 10 months ago May 16, 2023, 6:27 p.m. EDT
Updated: 10 months ago May 16, 2023, 6:27 p.m. EDT

This is an electrostatics problem and there are a number of ways to address it. Some of the example electrostatics models available to you in the Application Library should be worth looking at. If you are a new user, see also: https://www.comsol.com/learning-center . You may want to set floating potentials on your plate and cylinder -- you can find some discussions about how to do that, if you search this forum.

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Scientific Applications & Research Associates (SARA) Inc.
www.comsol.com/partners-consultants/certified-consultants/sara
This is an electrostatics problem and there are a number of ways to address it. Some of the example electrostatics models available to you in the Application Library should be worth looking at. If you are a new user, see also: https://www.comsol.com/learning-center . You may want to set *floating potentials* on your plate and cylinder -- you can find some discussions about how to do that, if you search this forum.

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Posted: 9 months ago Jun 5, 2023, 2:40 a.m. EDT

This is an electrostatics problem and there are a number of ways to address it. Some of the example electrostatics models available to you in the Application Library should be worth looking at. If you are a new user, see also: https://www.comsol.com/learning-center . You may want to set floating potentials on your plate and cylinder -- you can find some discussions about how to do that, if you search this forum.

Thank you sir ,

When adding a floating potential, the amount of charge required for a dielectric glass material depends on various factors such as the size and geometry of the glass, the desired potential, and the specific properties of the glass.

>This is an electrostatics problem and there are a number of ways to address it. Some of the example electrostatics models available to you in the Application Library should be worth looking at. If you are a new user, see also: https://www.comsol.com/learning-center . >You may want to set *floating potentials* on your plate and cylinder -- you can find some discussions about how to do that, if you search this forum. Thank you sir , When adding a floating potential, the amount of charge required for a dielectric glass material depends on various factors such as the size and geometry of the glass, the desired potential, and the specific properties of the glass.

Robert Koslover Certified Consultant

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Posted: 9 months ago Jun 6, 2023, 9:24 a.m. EDT

It would seem that I incorrectly assumed you were talking about conducting plates and cylinders, since you did not initially mention dielectrics. If you are talking about glass or other insulating materials, then these do not impose constant potentials upon their boundaries, so one would generally not assign any floating potentials there. In most such cases, one would simply assign appropriate material properties to the dielectric, mesh these parts along with the rest of the computational domain, and not assign specific boundary conditions to the insulators at all, unless you also mean to give them a non-zero net charge or perhaps model some kind of atypical or additional physics.

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Scientific Applications & Research Associates (SARA) Inc.
www.comsol.com/partners-consultants/certified-consultants/sara
It would seem that I incorrectly assumed you were talking about *conducting* plates and cylinders, since you did not initially mention dielectrics. If you are talking about glass or other insulating materials, then these do not impose constant potentials upon their boundaries, so one would generally not assign any floating potentials there. In most such cases, one would simply assign appropriate material properties to the dielectric, mesh these parts along with the rest of the computational domain, and not assign specific boundary conditions to the insulators at all, unless you also mean to give them a non-zero net charge or perhaps model some kind of atypical or additional physics.

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