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All posts by Lexi Carver

Surface, Volume, and Line Plots: Visualizing Results on a Heat Sink

September 1, 2014

Plotting visual simulation results on a model geometry is a great way to unveil the sometimes-mysterious physics happening behind the scenes in a device. Like learning a language, knowing how to use postprocessing tools helps designers investigate and understand their designs and processes more fully. Surface, volume, and line plots are three of the most common plot types used in postprocessing, and are applicable to many simulations.

Stress and Fatigue in Modular Implants Used in Hip Joints

July 24, 2014

Modular orthopedic devices, common in replacement joints, allow surgeons to tailor the size, material, and design of an implant directly to a patient’s needs. This flexibility and customization is counterbalanced, however, by a need for the implant components to fit together correctly. With parts that are not ideally matched, micro-motions and stresses on mismatched surfaces can cause fretting fatigue and corrosion. Researchers at Continuum Blue Ltd. have assessed changes to femoral implant designs to quantify and prevent this damage.

Improving Atmosphere Revitalization for Manned Spacecraft

July 15, 2014

In order to carry astronauts safely beyond earth’s atmosphere to where they can explore outer space, spacecraft must provide a very important chemical mixture: breathable air. Given the limits on space and weight for a manned shuttle, the systems flying aboard the craft must revitalize the air inside rather than carry the full amount needed for a mission. With this in mind, a team at NASA has developed an approach to atmosphere revitalization that relies on water adsorption.

Understanding Drug-Eluting Stents at Boston Scientific

June 18, 2014

Cardiovascular disease is a condition where the arteries in the heart are blocked by plaque. Narrowed arteries can restrict blood flow and cause chest pain and shortness of breath. Bare metal stents can be used to resolve the problem, but excessive tissue can grow over them and narrow the artery again (a process called restenosis). Engineers at Boston Scientific are using simulation to understand the release mechanisms in drug-eluting stents, which can be used to prevent this excess cell growth.

Cable Simulations Spark New Developments at Prysmian Group

June 3, 2014

Energy and telecom cables often journey through harsh environments to reach their destinations. Some cables are responsible for carrying high currents and must navigate in conditions that include high thermal loads, mechanical loads, and limited ventilation. We recently published a story in the IEEE Spectrum Insert, Multiphysics Simulation, explaining how the Prysmian Group, a leader in developing cable systems across many industries, has begun using COMSOL Multiphysics to improve their development process, save resources, and optimize their cable designs.

How to Include Geometry Surfaces with Solution Plots

May 26, 2014

When you have solved a model, you want to visualize your results in the best way possible. Today, we will explain how to include geometry surfaces with your solution plots, by way of an RF modeling example.

Powerful Packaging for Electronics in Extreme Environments

May 16, 2014

The power electronics industry is responsible for products used by billions of people: smartphones, televisions, certain car parts, and even components in motors and household objects. With such a diverse array of applications, many design requirements are considered during the making of these products, including power and energy density, cost, and customer safety. Arkansas Power Electronics International (APEI), a USA-based company, is refining designs for power packaging to control thermal management in power electronics devices, increase efficiency, and lower cost.

Modeling Superconductivity in a YBCO Wire

May 6, 2014

Superconductors are used in applications where high current density and magnetic fields are present — including electric generators, biomagnetic technology, and common products, such as fast digital circuits. Theoretically, an unlimited amount of current can flow through a wire made of a superconducting material. However, what happens to a superconductor as the current density exceeds critical limits? Let’s find out.


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